Empty Bowls

Empty Bowls 2017, FRCH

This year a group of FRCH-ers got together to donate their time and talent to a local organization called Empty Bowls of Butler County.  The Empty Bowls concept started over 25 years ago in Michigan as an international project to fight hunger, personalized by artists and art organizations on a community level. People in the community contribute soup bowls that are individually painted and the finished products are then used as serving pieces for a fundraising meal of soup and bread. Contributing guests are then able to keep the empty bowls. Today Empty Bowls has grown to an innumerable number of events all over the country, benefiting numerous non-profits.

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The “Find Your Art” Results

FRCH, Artswave, Find Your Art, Chair Challenge

Two weeks ago we kicked off our #FindYourArt Chair Challenge – where volunteers from each FRCH studio put their creative minds (and hands) to work to benefit ArtsWave, by reimagining their canvas: a chair. Each studio was given $25 and only two weeks to transform their chair, which are now available for eBay bidding through this Thursday, March 23 at 4:00 pm. Please share the eBay listings below with friends and family (but note that local pickup is required).  Read more of this post

Maker’s Faire

MFB

The White House recently announced the 2016 National Week of Making (June 17-23). Inspired by the event, our FRCH Maker’s Faire showcased the work of many of our talented and skilled colleagues.

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Creativity Practice

Sometimes when I feel like I’m experiencing imaginative stagnation – or if I’m just bored while waiting for the serving staff to deliver my meal – I search for a way to kick-start my creativity. My mother and I used to scribble on the back of paper place mats to give each other some doodle direction. We would turn the paper until we could see an image in the scribble, and then we would develop another place mat masterpiece. I later upgraded this practice to scribbling with watercolor paint because it allows me to better see where my artwork originated. I have since called this practice technique “Blobbing.” It is a great exercise to strengthen your visual mind, and to keep you keen on spontaneity. If you have ever spent some time lying in a field making shapes out of the clouds, then you will know exactly what to do. Read more of this post