Hanging Around

Being part of the Hospitality Studio, I am always interested in staying at unique and different lodging experiences when traveling. So, on a recent trip to the Pacific Northwest with my husband and friends, we journeyed a little further north than originally planned to spend the night in sphere tree houses. It was definitely worth it! Read more of this post

How to Make a Built in Bookcase

bsrendBuilt-ins give a richness to a room, both residential and commercial.  Here is a foolproof way of creating a unique bookcase with a display shelf inspired by retail millwork. Read more of this post

Kem Weber Chair Build

disney_weber

Kem Weber (Karl Emanuel Martin Weber) is best known as the architect of the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California.  Walt Disney hired Weber in the late 1930’s (after the success of Snow White) to not only design the studio, but also the interiors and furnishings needed to operate an animation studio. Weber even created a font for the studio that is still used today. The picture above shows one of his chair designs, “The Airline Chair,” being used by some of the animators in the 1950’s, during the production of Sleeping Beauty.   Read more of this post

A Brief History of Construction Materials

Flickr image

Image via flickr.com

“There exists a dynamic exchange between the life of matter and the matter of our lives.”

-Reiser and Umemeto

Each material has its own unique way of acting and reacting with its environment. As designers we are responsible for creating the appropriate expression for each condition. Whether this is executed through scale, patterns, joinery, or structural articulation depends on the nature of the material itself. However, the complexity and sheer volume of today’s innovative products can make it seem like we need to be scientists to understand the behavior of many contemporary materials. This entry is part one of a series on unraveling that myth. As a designer by day and aspiring materials scientist by night, I hope to give some insight into how new materials behave and inspire ideas about how we can express these behaviors through design. In lieu of the 45th anniversary of FRCH, I thought it would be appropriate to start by taking a look back at the history of traditional building materials, and what was primarily available to work with when the firm started in 1968.

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